BOB MORIARTY:

www.321gold.com & www.321energy.com

KEVIN VECMANIS:

www.vanaurum.ca

PROVEN AND PROBABLE:

WEBSITE: https://provenandprobable.com
YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/c/provenandprobable.com
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VIDEO

 

https://youtu.be/iq36DeTzIsU

AUDIO

https://soundcloud.com/proven-and-probable/bob-moriarty-kevin-vecmanis-the-next-big-thing

TRANSCRIPT

Maurice Jackson:

Welcome to Proven And Probable where we focus on metals, mining and more. I’m your host, Maurice Jackson. Our show includes two special guests joining us today, Bob Moriarty, the founder of 321gold and 321energy.com, and Kevin Vecmanis the founder of the VanAurum Report. Today we will discuss the last big thing and the next big thing. Gentlemen, welcome to the show.

Bob Moriarty:

Good to be here.

Kevin Vecmanis:

Yeah, great to be here, Maurice.

Maurice Jackson:

Gentlemen, we have a lot of ground to cover for our audience, so let’s get started. First topic, Bitcoin. Is it the next big thing or the last big thing? Bob, I’d like to begin with you, sir. But before you answer, can you share with us the most important book you found on investing and how it applies for today’s discussion.

Bob Moriarty:

That would have to be Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds and I have never met a successful investor who has not read the book. But, I need to interject this. Your spelling is bad.

Maurice Jackson:

Where’s that sir?

Bob Moriarty:

You said Bitcoin. It’s not Bitcoin, it’s BitCon, B-I-T-C-O-N. You messed up the word.

Maurice Jackson:

Give me my leg back, you’re pulling my leg here sir.

Bob Moriarty:

Quick as a whip, you are.

Maurice Jackson:

Carry on sir, with BitCon.

Bob Moriarty:

Okay. When I was 22, I was in Vietnam. I was flying the F4 and they wanted to put me into a ground FAC job, running around on the ground, carrying a rifle. And I was smart enough to realize that I really didn’t wanna do that. So, I got myself transferred into the Bird dog, a forward air control aircraft, single-engine Cessna high wing. And we controlled all the artillery strikes and air strikes and naval gunfire in northern I-corps.

Now because I have flown tail-dragger aircraft, prop-driven tail-dragger aircraft, they made me the training officer because all the other guys were A-4 pilots or F-4 pilots or H-6 pilots. They were all jet jocks. So I had to do the training and we would go up and I would teach them how to fly the airplane and I would teach them how to land.

And one of the most important things was teach’em how to navigate and strangely enough, navigating with a map and just looking around is very easy to do. What you do is you look at the most obvious thing you can, whether it’s a railroad track, whether it’s an eight lane highway, whether it’s the ocean, whether it’s a river, whether it’s city. Look around you 360 degrees and find the most obvious feature you can and then orient yourself from that. And that’s what investors need to do. They need to ask themselves the right question. And the right question about BitCon … And if you answer the question correctly, you will make money in investing … Is of the 1,503 variations of BitCon, how many will survive?

Maurice Jackson:

And that’s a great question for our audience. And Bob if you would also share with us, with regards to BitCon as we know it as a currency, what causes the price to go up and the price to go down versus your traditional currency? The U.S. dollar … Canadian dollar …

Bob Moriarty:

It’s not a currency. It’s an electronic Beanie Baby. It was formed to give people a handy way of buying illegal drugs and cheating on their taxes. And I think that’s a great idea. Okay, and I can see that being very successful, however it turned into this fear of missing out, you know. I went down to McDonald’s and I got this Beanie Baby and it cost me $4.99 for a meal and the Beanie Baby is worth $2,000 dollars. BitCon is an electronic Beanie Baby. That’s all it is. It’s not a currency.

Maurice Jackson:

I would agree with you. I just wanted to get your response on that, sir. So, just to clarify, it is not the next big thing? Or is it the last big thing?

Bob Moriarty:

Oh, it’s the last big thing. It was the last big thing. It topped in December. One of the guys who called it very accurately was Clyde Mauld. Another guy that called it very accurately was Peak Prosperity, Chris Martenson, and I think I did an interview with you, but I did two or three interviews all at the same time … Said it’s a top … And it’s a bubble. And it’s gonna crash. And the amazing thing is three months later, a lot of people still don’t realize it’s crashed and they’re not going to until it’s down 90%. And then they’ll figure it out. But it’s the last big thing, not the next big thing.

Maurice Jackson:

Alright, Kevin, the VanAurum Report analyzes markets and trends. What does the VanAurum Report suggest about Bitcoin or BitCon?

Kevin Vecmanis:

I think Bob’s bang on about a lot of things. When it comes to, we’ll call them exchange assets if we don’t want to call them currencies, but, you know, what puts a floor under the price of these typist things is ultimately they’re use case and the demand that they’re … the demand that exists for actually using it in day-to-day transactions, so … You know, take the U.S. dollar for example. One of the primary support structures for the U.S. dollar has always been the global energy trade and up until very recently, countries that wanted to transact oil internationally had to do so using U.S. dollars ’cause of the security arrangement that the U.S. made with the Kingdom of Assad back in the seventies. And that’s created a lot of demand for U.S. dollars that otherwise wouldn’t exist so …

Something similar also exists with crypto-currencies. It’s no different, at least in the long term. You know like Bob said, we’re past the mania phase and I think a lot of what was driving that was the fear of missing out. But now we’re moving into the reality phase of these things where the value proposition of the assets is ultimately gonna be tested. And the price that the market assigns to it is gonna be dependent on how people ultimately wanna use it and in the volumes that they wanna use it in the future.

Bob pointed out that a lot of these currencies have already crashed. 46% of last year’s ICOs, or initial coin offerings, have already failed. And an additional 13% are what they call “semi-failed” which means that the team has stopped communicating or it’s a fraud or the probability success has been registered close to zero by the community, so that’s basically 59% of last year’s ICOs have already danced with investors’ money. I think that number is probably gonna get close to 90, 95, maybe to 99% by 2018. I mean, that’s just the law of disproportionality. That’s Pareto’s principle at work. So we’re gonna see the same thing play with the cryptocurrency space. Bitcoin could go to zero without a major change in the total cryptocurrency market, although that’s unlikely. But I think BitCoin ultimately will be the victim of creative destruction over time as people realize more valuable use cases.

It takes something like Ethereum … Ethereum is ultimately a currency that the validators in the network get paid to actually verify the transactions that are undergone on the smart contract system. So, there’s somewhat tangible value there. I was reading this morning and I think it was Tennessee … They just underwent their first Blockchain real estate transaction and that’s a trend that you’re gonna see to continue. And that’s ultimately the long-term use case of the Blockchain network … Is removing a lot of the friction involved in transactional processes and assets, no matter what they are … And the people that are actually validating those transactions … They’re gonna get paid in something. And what they’re getting paid in is the cryptocurrencies that are on those networks. So that real estate transaction that took place in the U.S. … It was the first one. That was settled in Ethereum because the people that have to approve the transaction … They run computers and that’s the key that they chart.

So, Ethereum is gonna have this floor under it … A floor under the prices proportional to how much transactions are being validated on that network. Is Bitcoin gonna be propped up by the same phenomenon? I don’t know. I don’t see it. I think there’s a lot of overhang and technologically, in the Bitcoin space, I think people are gonna figure out better ways of using the networks and I think Bitcoin could become the price.com of bubble that we’re in cryptocurrencies.

Maurice Jackson:

You know, Kevin, you referenced Blockchain and some confuse it with cryptocurrencies and/or BitCoin. What is the difference?

Kevin Vecmanis:

Well, BitCoin is a use case of the Blockchain network and the so-called miners … They call them miners. All these people are doing is they’re validating transactions that are happening on the Block or the Blockchain. Every time there’s a change … Every time somebody alters it … Every time somebody wants to make a transaction with another person … The whole purpose of the Blockchain is that it’s immutable and it’s this permanent record in time, but it requires a lot of computing power to actually alter those. You can think about … Have you guys ever used shared spreadsheets before online?

Bob Moriarty:

Sure.

Kevin Vecmanis:

You know, it’s like imagine using a shared spreadsheet online, but with a million people and everybody is trying to edit it at once. That’s basically akin to what the Blockchain is, at least with BitCoin. You can obviously imagine there’s technological problems with that. With keeping up with all the changes … And people are discovering different ways of doing that. You know, they’re breaking off Blockchains into parallel versions, so that they run faster. It’s an evolving technology. I wouldn’t say that it’s a money … The extent to which these cryptocurrencies are gonna have value is ultimately gonna depend on how valuable the use case is and what kind of compensation the people validating the network are demanding. So, we’ll see that unfold over time.

I think Bob’s bang on with the Bitcoin price. We saw a counter-trend rally. I actually did some trend analysis with my machine learning system in VanAurum and it’s indicated quite obviously you don’t need a machine learning system to tell you this. It’s in the downtrend. I think we had a bit of a counter-trend snapback rally, which was expected. It might even surprise people and go in a little higher. I think the maximum it could go right now is $14,000 thousand, but I think ultimately it’s gonna round trip and end up … My long term forecast for it over the next three year is about $250.

Maurice Jackson:

Now, Bob, I have a question for you in reference to Blockchain, but before that, Kevin, talk to us about a capital vortex and how it applies to today’s discussion.

Kevin Vecmanis:

Capital vortex … You see these things from time to time in history and it’s really something that just captures the imagination of people. Bob pointed it out with the book Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds. A lot of the instances discussed in that book can be thought of as capital vortexes. Even the South Sea bubble was in itself a bit of a capital vortex. That opened up a lot of trade and interest over to the America’s. Whenever you have these capital vortexes, there’s tons of infrastructure and intellectual energy that pours into a very specific space. And no matter how wasteful it might seem at the time, there’s always something useful that survives, coming out the other end.

And with the Blockchain, you know we’re seeing this tremendous amount of mining or validation infrastructure being built. There’s people repurposing old, actual physical mining infrastructure in Canada to build BitCoin mining infrastructure … Cryptocurrency mining infrastructure … And so you have this huge validation network that’s being constructed. There’s lots of intellectual capital pouring into it. And at the end of the day, somebody is going to figure out a really, really, really smart and profitable and effective way of using all this infrastructure that’s built. Do I know what it is right now? No, I’m not gonna claim that I do, but somebody is gonna figure it out, just the same way that Google and Facebook figured out how to use the very foundations of the Internet to add tremendous amounts of value. Somebody is gonna figure out how to use the Blockchain network to add a tremendous amount of value in the future, as well. It’s just a matter of time.

Maurice Jackson:

So, just for the record here, Blockchain … You foresee it as being the next big thing?

Kevin Vecmanis:

Blockchain is one of those transformational technologies, I think, that’s gonna really, really lubricate the transactional processes of the economy as a whole. I wouldn’t call it the new Internet. I mean I think it’s an iteration built on top of the Internet as a platform and I think it’s ultimately just … What it’s doing is allowing us to most effectively use the infrastructure of the Internet that we’ve already built. So it’s another use case for the Internet in the spare capacity that exists, floating around, and, you know, people looked at it and basically said, “Okay, we’ve got this massive network globally. Maybe we can use it to validate transactions without any third parties.” And now you’ve got the Blockchain. And it’s a great idea and it’s gonna grow from there. I think at the time the Internet was created, I mean, that was really the next big thing. I think Blockchain is more of a evolutionary step, more than a revolutionary step. But I mean that’s semantics. You could argue it either way.

Maurice Jackson:

Alright, Bob, do you see Blockchain as the next big thing? Or something else?

Bob Moriarty:

I think that he used a very good term there. That it’s evolutionary rather than revolutionary … Blockchain has actually been around for 10 years and nobody has figured out a real use for it that generates value. Yeah, somebody told me, “Well you can do a transfer to Tokyo in a matter of seconds and it costs almost nothing. ” And I say, “Well I can do that right now. I can do a transfer of any amount to Tokyo. It takes seconds and it costs me 25 bucks. So, what are you gonna do? You gonna save me 25 bucks?”

I think that … Well here’s what I know. I know it’s the biggest bubble in financial history. It got up to about $800 billion dollars and I think about probably $750 billion dollars is gonna go to BitCon heaven. It was a bubble. It has burst. It will crash. Something valuable will come out of it, but we don’t know it.

I mean, you’re not old enough to remember it … The first calculator was called the Bowmar Brain. And I think it spent %500 bucks for a little four function calculator and now they give four function calculators away in Cheerio’s boxes because the calculator is cheaper than the Cheerio’s. Things change. Once upon a time, Radio Shack made the Trash-80, the TRS-80 computer. Radio Shack has gone to BitCon heaven. Things change. They improve. Creative destruction means you need to burn your bustles down once a year and reinvent it. I’m not sure what the next big thing is. I just know there will be a next big thing.

Maurice Jackson:

Well, we know that BitCon is not the next big thing.

Bob Moriarty:

No, it’s the last big thing.

Maurice Jackson:

Alright, switching gears … Gentlemen, a large segment of our audience are active buyers of precious metals. And I’d like to remind our listeners that I am a precious metals representative of Miles Franklin Precious Metals Investments. Bob, you reference Extraordinarily Popular Delusions, but a book equally important, which is a book you authored … Nobody Knows Anything … Which can be found on our education tab at provenandprobable.com is germane to our discussion today.

I reference Nobody Knows Anything because it fundamentally changed my ideology to acquiring precious metals. I have shifted my focus from worry manipulation and currency crash and more onto ratios and trading between the metals. Bob, can you share your views on manipulation and how you apply the ratios between the metals.

Bob Moriarty:

Well, they’re two totally different subjects. First of all, all financial markets are manipulated. It’s meaningless. We know governments manipulate currencies. We know they manipulate the stock market. We know they manipulate interest rates. We don’t care because it’s part of life. We know the sun rises in the morning in the East. But your life doesn’t revolve around that. So when guys run around saying gold and silver are manipulated, they’re telling you the truth, but they’re not giving you any information. Yeah, they’re manipulated. So what? Live with it.

Going back to ratios … The concept of the book is things are a lot more simple than people believe and if you’ll do things in a simple way, you can make a lot of money. Now, the best ratio trade that I can think of right now would be the gold/silver trade. I wrote the book two years ago and I talked about when silver gets above 80 ounces of silver to buy one ounce of gold, you should buy silver and sell gold. You should always buy what’s cheap and sell what’s dear. Right now, in comparison to silver, gold is expensive and silver is cheap, in comparison to gold. And you need not make it any more complicated than that. That’s a trade that’s been very successful. It might last for a year or two, but it’s been successful every time that people have gotten into it. And those kind of trades, you want. Everybody wants some. “I wanna go buy something that doubles tomorrow.” That was the attraction to BitCon. Well, a lot of money went to BitCon heaven. Okay, the silver/gold trade …People are gonna make money and they’re gonna keep the money.

Maurice Jackson:

Bob, do precious metals fit into the narrative of the next big thing or the last big thing?

Bob Moriarty:

It’s an interesting question, and it’s not a question I can answer. I don’t look at gold and silver as a religion. I don’t worship them. I don’t pray to them. I don’t hope for $50,000 thousand gold or $5,000 thousand silver because I’m not sure I would want to live in a world with $50,000 thousand gold. But one of the functions of gold and silver is to act as an insurance policy. Anyone who is nervous of banks, or the economy, or the stock market, or currencies, certainly should consider an insurance policy. And gold, silver, platinum, rhodium, palladium have served as insurance policies for a lot of years, and been successful insurance policies.

Maurice Jackson:

Kevin, how does the VanAurum Report view precious metals as a whole, with today’s discussion?

Kevin Vecmanis:

Yeah, so one of the things we do at VanAurum … Just for the sake of your listeners, VanAurum is an artificial intelligence based financial research engine that I’ve built from the ground up and I use it to identify statistically significant trends and indicators that have been significant in the past and I look at ways of applying those forward to making good investment decisions, hopefully. So, one of the things we do there is, for each asset class that we cover, we try to determine what the best indicator of primary trend is. And I think our gold trend indicator is excellent. Right now, it’s showing gold as in a primary uptrend. That indicator has switched 19 times since 1970, so it’s slow moving indicator. Right now, it’s indicating a primary uptrend. I happen to believe that.

It’s gonna be difficult for the U.S. dollar to gain any relevant strength, you know, with the overhang of just the enormous deficits that are being pumped out, the trade war we’ve got going on, and the unsustainable debt situation. I can’t imagine a situation, with all those three things basically hitting right now, that the U.S. dollar is gonna amount to any kind of sustainable rally over the next 1, 3, 5, even 10 years. So that’s gonna be a primary tailwind for gold going forward. And ultimately until there’s a new international monetary system that emerges globally … I don’t know what that’s gonna be … But things need to change. Right now, there’s some much excess, Roth, and undergrowth that’s built up in the system that needs to be burned out. And I think, until that happens, gold is gonna be an excellent … Like Bob said … Gold is gonna be an excellent insurance policy for those people that are nervous.

We’re not showing a primary uptrend in silver yet. That being said, you know, Bob pointed out the gold-silver ratio being above 80 … We sent out some research to our members last week on that. And almost across every time frame, historically there are statistically significant cumulative excess returns on silver over gold and silver over its mean historical returns, when the ratio is above this level.

So, like Bob said, I had some members message me and ask me how I know that silver’s not gonna fall further and the answer is that I don’t. But like Bob has pointed out in his book and on the show, you buy things as an investor … You want to buy things when they’re cheap. You know, could silver fall another 20%, 30%? Of course. But it’d just be even cheaper. It’s cheap right now. It’ll be cheaper if it falls further … Cheap relative to gold … So, those are the type of things that I think you wanna make long-term investments in. So, although silver’s not showing an uptrend in our system yet, I am an active accumulator of silver and silver assets, just for the record.

Maurice Jackson:

Alright, now gentlemen, I’m sure our audience would enjoy if you would share your thoughts on each of the big five respectively in this order. You’ve hinted on all of them. Gold, silver, platinum, palladium, and rhodium … ‘Cause we all have our favorites … Kevin, the floor is yours.

Kevin Vecmanis:

Okay, yeah gold … Gold is showing a lot of relative strength, even over the last decade with respect to the S&P 500, it’s outperforming commodities as a whole. It’s outperforming pretty much every major asset class, you know, on a relative basis. We’re showing a lot of relative strength anyway. I like gold, but going forward, I wouldn’t think of not owning it, given the fiscal situation that’s overhanging the world globally.

Silver … You know, last week we had our first … silver speculators were short, what, 1500 contracts last week. That was the first time in 15 years that happened. So the last time we were in that short in silver contracts was in April of 2003 and when that occurred, the price rallied almost 100% in the following 12 months. Combined with that, you’ve got the gold-silver ratio where historically you’ve got statistically significant over-performance in silver. So, I like silver a lot right now. I like silver related assets. They’re cheap. Nobody is talking about it. If you talk about buying silver at dinner parties or amongst your friends, you know, people raise an eyebrow. Everybody always wants to bring up BitCoin. Those are the types of things I like to buy.

I’m not a major expert on palladium, rhodium, or platinum. The one thing I will say though is that as time goes on, society advances and improvements in technology produce economies as scale that have a larger impact on some goods than others. So, when you’re analyzing the ratios of these things, it’s important not the view it as a static system, historically. So, commodities as a whole are … I think, are incredibly undervalued, with respect to basically everything. I mean, financial assets, relative to real assets as a whole are tremendously overvalued. At least some of that overvaluation can be explained by the shift in the makeup of the world’s top companies.

So, the top companies in the S&P 500 for example … I mean, these aren’t industrial companies anymore. These are technology companies that are leveraging software and digital technologies, to use … They’re earning more dollar per unit of commodity input than they were in, say, the seventies or eighties. So, you would expect the ratio of the S&P 500 … the commodities to rise over time … But I think that only explains a bit of it. I think the rest of that out performance and the part that matters for investors can be explained by the direct or indirect impacts of central bank asset purchases that have been going on almost for a decade.

From a game theory perspective, right now there are very few actions that central banks can take today that won’t result in an acceleration of inflation and a revaluation of that ratio of financial assets to real assets, so I think investors need to position themselves on the right side of that.

Maurice Jackson:

Bob, share your thoughts on the big five with us.

Bob Moriarty:

Okay, ignore price. And only focus on the relative value. The cheapest of the five is silver and the way to measure that is against gold or against platinum or palladium. And silver is the cheapest. The next cheapest is platinum. Palladium has actually gone to a premium over platinum, but from a catalytic converter point of view, platinum is more valuable than palladium because it’s denser. I see palladium dropping and platinum increasing. A platinum-palladium spread would be a very good spread. You buy the cheap commodity of platinum and you sell the expensive commodity, which is palladium.

Rhodium is interesting because as of two or three years ago, you can actually buy rhodium now in bar form. Baird bars are one-ounce rhodium bars and I bought a bunch of them. Rhodium actually got down to about $600 an ounce two years ago. At $600 an ounce, it was very, very cheap and it’s climbed substantially. It’s gone up more than any of the other five and it’s about $1700. But rhodium is a tiny, tiny market compared to any of the other four. So rhodium has the potential to explode higher. It’s not cheap anymore, but it could get a lot more expensive than it is.

Maurice Jackson:

And I wanna just remind our listeners at Miles Franklin Precious Metals Investments, we do sell the one-ounce rhodium bars. They are not on our website, but if you contact me directly, we can facilitate that transaction for you. Gentlemen before we close, I wanna ask you, what keeps you up at night that we don’t know about? Kevin …

Kevin Vecmanis:

What keeps … Oh, I don’t know. My dog barking at strange sounds during the night is usually what’s waking me up. The world is dynamic and you can choose to be negative on things or you can choose to be positive. There’s a good and bad to everything. You know, and with every major problem, there’s also a really, really major investment opportunity, if people are just observant.

But you know what, one thing that does concern me is … And I can’t believe the lack of airtime it gets. It’s getting more airtime in the mainstream news now. It’s the debt situation in the world and the level of malinvestment that’s come over the last decade from suppressed interest rates. Debt is exploding, almost relative to everything. Debt to GDP levels globally are at levels that historically have been precursors to major global conflicts. And this happens because as debt grows, you know, especially internationally, you inevitably get more and more tension in between creditors and debtors. And eventually those tensions start to flare up. You know, we’re seeing that now with Trump’s trade war. And China seems to be the major character] of that.

You know, if you look at every major conflict in history, one of the main precursors to all of them has been a cessation of trade or the absence of trade. And the difference today … You know, like we were talking about before the show started … Is that the world is much more interconnected now than it’s ever been. I mean, you’ve got a really, really granular division of labor and any major disruption to global trade right now is gonna have commensurately higher consequences than it did, say 30, 40, 50 years ago when a lot of the production was more domestic than it is today, instead of international.

So, if there’s one thing that keeps me up, I would have to say that it’s the seeming unwillingness of governments right now to face the stark reality of the fiscal situation. And because there’s no politically expedient way to deal with the debt levels and the fiscal overhang, unfortunately, I think the solution is gonna be forced upon us by the market. And I don’t see that turning out well, at least in the short term.

Maurice Jackson:

Bob, what keeps you up at night that we don’t know about, sir?

Bob Moriarty:

Well, it’s really interesting that you ask that question. I’m glad you asked Kevin first. It’s actually Kevin’s dog that keeps me up. The damn dog barks all night long and if he doesn’t shut that dog up, I’m gonna go shoot him.

I’m sorry, Kevin. You just kinda opened yourself up for that.

Here’s what scares me. It doesn’t keep me up at night. I sleep like a baby. We have an ongoing coup d’etat against the president of the United States. And while I think that in many aspects Donald Trump is blibbering idiot, he’s not nearly as crooked as Hillary Clinton was. The deep state has declared a war against Trump. It is an absolute coup d’etat. They’re doing illegal things. It’s obvious. The whole Russian thing is a big fat nothing burger. The CIA … The Department of Justice … The FBI … The mainstream media is trying to overthrow the president of the United States.

Now, don’t think for a minute that just because I didn’t like Trump that I’m in favor of the coup d’etat. I didn’t like Bush. I didn’t like Obama. I think that we are getting the kind of leadership that you get at end of empire. But the one thing that I can say is coup d’etats always end badly. They’re unpredictable. When 91% of the media reports about Trump are negative, you’ve got a very scary situation going on. That’s gonna be the big surprise. Something very bad is gonna happen. I don’t know what it’s gonna be.

Maurice Jackson:

Gentlemen, last question: what did I forget to ask? Kevin, the floor is yours.

Kevin Vecmanis:

I don’t know. I think we’ve covered a lot here today. It’s a pretty good discussion, actually.

Maurice Jackson:

Fair enough, sir. Bob, the floor is yours, sir.

Bob Moriarty:

Well, I can’t believe that Kevin missed this. And I’m gonna take some of the credit for giving attention to Kevin. I stumbled across something he wrote months ago and I thought, “Hey, wait a minute. This guy is absolutely brilliant. He’s approaching things from a different point of view. And what’s he’s doing … It’s very valuable.” And I wanna say it’s not because I agree with him on everything or even anything, but what we have missed is the next big thing is probably artificial intelligence. And he is using that in a financially valuable way. He’s an early adopter. And artificial intelligence is one of those things … It’s like hand grenade. It can be very dangerous in the wrong hands, so I’m thrilled … I’ve told a lot of people about Kevin and about his website. I know he’s gonna succeed. And I know he’s a very valuable contributor to the financial market. But, that’s what we missed. I mean, it was right there in front of us and we all missed it.

Maurice Jackson:

Well, Mr. Vecmanis, you’re the new kid on the block. For our listeners, tell us more about your services and the contact details.

Kevin Vecmanis:

Yeah, so like what Bob was saying my passion is artificial intelligence and finance. And at the end of the day, I’m not much of an expert in anything. The markets are so complicated. It’s so dynamic. I mean, I use artificial intelligence in conjunction with some of my own financial research in an attempt to filter out the noise out of the market and try to surface as close to a pure signal as you can get, which is really difficult. It’s not a crystal ball, but artificial intelligence is really, really powerful at just eliminating 99% of the junk and the bad signals and everything else that comes with technical analysis and other information. And this tries to leave you with the most actionable signals possible. And, you know, that changes all the time. The market is dynamic. It’s really challenging applying artificial intelligence to the market, but we’ve had some success with it.

So, Bob I appreciate the kind words there. People can visit the site. It’s www.vanaurum.ca. That’s V-A-N like Vancouver. And aurum like the Latin word for gold. And yeah y’all, artificial intelligence is a whole other conversation. Maybe we can have another podcast about that, but …

Maurice Jackson:

Certainly.

Kevin Vecmanis:

It’s actually mind-boggling what’s happening in AI right now. And I follow a lot of artificial intelligence blogs. And yeah, I think Bob’s right, AI is something that’s gonna sideswipe majority of the world. It’s coming so fast, but that’s a conversation for another day for sure.

Maurice Jackson:

And for our listeners … To get more information on Bob Moriarty and his work, please visit www.321gold and/or 321energy.com.

We want to remind our listeners. For all your precious metals investment needs, please visit www.milesfranklin.com or email me directly for a consultation: maurice@milesfranklin.com.  You may reach me at 919-274-5680. Gentlemen, I want to thank you both for your time today and for everyone listening, thank you for joining us today on Proven and Probable.

Bob Moriarty:

Good deal. Thank you, Maurice.

Maurice Jackson:

Yes, sir.

Kevin Vecmanis:

Thanks, Maurice. And thanks for the kind words there, Bob. I appreciate that.

Bob Moriarty:

Well, it’s my genuine pleasure.

Proven & Probable

 

Maurice Jackson

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